A Blessing in Disguise-Daikon Radish

A Blessing in Disguise-Daikon Radish

November 08, 2020

Well lo and be hold-we planted a cover crop soil buster blend that contained a variety of items and one of them was "Groundhog Radish". Hmmmmm. Never heard of it. Now we are getting gladly acquainted with Mr. Groundhog.

"What is groundhog radish?”, You may ask. It is technically called Daikon Radish originating in Asia & Europe. (Botanical name: Raphanus Stivus longipinnatus), and otherwise known as Winter Radish, Forage Radish, Groundhog forage radish, and oilseed radish. It can be used as a valuable overcrop in breaking apart compacted soil, prevent erosion of bare soil, capture available Nitrogen in soil, just to name a few. It performs well at this by working its way deep into the soil extending as much as 6 feet deep. The tuber can grow a foot or more long and several inches in diameter. Deer love ‘em!

Besides being an excellent cover crop, it is delicious to eat! It tastes just like a radish. The bigger it is, the less pungent. It may be eaten raw as in a salad, along with its greens tops or both can be cooked and eaten like you would Greens and the tuber tastes just like a turnip! You can even can the radish as pickles! 

We grew these groundhog radishes without chemical fertilizers, no herbicides, no pesticides, no spray. We used turkey litter and compost. Freshly picked, cleaned and delivered to market to your table. Know you are getting the freshest locally grown Groundhog Radish, with no chemicals what-so-ever! They are popular in Asian and Indian Cooking and are known for their potent medicinal properties. We hope you can try our Groundhog radishes and love them as much as we and our neighbors do!

Daikon nutrition:

Daikon is a very-low-calorie vegetable yet has an impressive nutrient profile.

One 7-inch (18-cm) daikon weighing 12 ounces (338 grams) packs the following nutrients):

  • Calories: 61
  • Carbs: 14 grams
  • Protein: 2 grams
  • Fiber: 5 grams
  • Vitamin C: 124% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Folate (B9): 24% of the DV
  • Calcium: 9% of the DV
  • Magnesium: 14% of the DV
  • Potassium: 22% of the DV
  • Copper: 19% of the DV

Daikon is an excellent source of various nutrients, including calcium, magnesium, potassium, and copper. Still, it’s highest in vitamin C and folate.

Vitamin C is a water-soluble nutrient that’s essential to health and needed for many bodily functions, including immune system function and tissue growth and repair).

Plus, it doubles as a powerful antioxidant, protecting your body’s cells from oxidative damage).

Daikon is also rich in folate, a B vitamin that’s involved in cellular growth, red blood cell production, and DNA synthesis).

Foods rich in folate are particularly important during pregnancy, as this nutrient plays an integral role in the growth and development of the baby).

Daikon or Japanese Radish, is known in Japan as the “giant white radish”.  Look for those that have a tiny sheen and are firm, not spongy. Sweet and juicy, when grated it has a cleansing, mildly sharp flavor that provides a crisp counterpoint to salty food. Raw Daikon can be slivered, grated, diced, old sliced to add its crunch and zip to relishes and salads. It can be used in soups and stir fries, or pickled whole. Fresh raw daikon is known to contain diuretics, decongestants, digestive enzymes, and a substance that inhibits the formation of carcinogens in the body. 

Storage:

Daikons with greens removed may be stored in the fridge for 2-4 weeks. 

Greens attached to radishes may be stored for 3-5 days.

Note: All information presented is intended for informational purposes only. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for, nor does it replace, professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. If you have any concerns or questions about your health, you should always consult with a physician or other health-care professional.

We are not nutritionists or registered dietitians. Previous Statements have not been evaluated or approved by the Food and Drug Administration.